5 Best Yoga Asanas to Live Stress Free

live stress free

Yoga can be a wonderful practice to help reduce stress and promote overall well-being. Here are some yoga asanas (poses) that can help you live stress free life:

Child’s Pose (Balasana)

To live stress free, Balasana, also known as Child’s Pose, is a popular yoga asana (pose) that is often practiced as a resting position during a yoga session. The word “Balasana” comes from the Sanskrit words “bala” meaning “child” and “asana” meaning “pose” or “posture.”

To practice Balasana:

  1. Start by kneeling on the floor with your knees hip-width apart.
  2. Sit back on your heels and bring your big toes to touch.
  3. Separate your knees about as wide as your hips or slightly wider.
  4. Exhale and lower your torso down between your thighs.
  5. Lengthen your tailbone away from the back of your pelvis and gently bring your forehead to the floor.
  6. Place your arms alongside your body with your palms facing up or extend them forward with your palms resting on the mat.
  7. Soften your shoulders, relax your arms, and allow your back to gently round.
  8. Close your eyes and take slow, deep breaths, focusing on relaxing and surrendering into the pose.
  9. Hold the pose for as long as it feels comfortable, usually for about 1 to 3 minutes or longer if desired.
  10. To release the pose, gently walk your hands back towards your body, lifting your torso up and sitting back on your heels.

To live stress free, Balasana is a gentle pose that provides a stretch to the back, hips, and thighs while promoting a sense of relaxation and calm. It is often used as a resting pose between more challenging asanas or as a way to ground and center oneself during a yoga practice. It can also be practiced on its own as a way to relieve stress and tension in the body and mind.

Forward Fold (Uttanasana)

To live stress free, Forward Fold, also known as Uttanasana, is a standing yoga pose that involves folding forward from the hips and reaching towards the ground. It is commonly practiced as part of Sun Salutations and is beneficial for stretching the hamstrings, calves, and back, as well as calming the mind.

To practice Forward Fold (Uttanasana):

  1. Begin by standing in Tadasana (Mountain Pose), with your feet hip-width apart and your arms alongside your body.
  2. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, engage your core muscles and hinge forward at the hips, keeping your back straight.
  3. Bend your knees slightly if you need to, especially if you have tight hamstrings. The focus should be on lengthening the spine.
  4. As you fold forward, allow your head, neck, and arms to hang loosely towards the ground. Let go of any tension in your upper body.
  5. If it feels comfortable, you can grab opposite elbows with your hands and gently sway from side to side, releasing any additional tension in your upper back and shoulders.
  6. If your hamstrings allow, you can work towards straightening your legs while maintaining the length in your spine. However, it’s more important to prioritize the integrity of the posture rather than forcing yourself into a deep forward fold.
  7. Breathe deeply and relax into the pose. Feel the stretch in the back of your legs and the release of tension in your spine.
  8. Stay in Uttanasana for several breaths, enjoying the sensation of surrendering and letting go.
  9. To come out of the pose, bend your knees slightly and bring your hands to your hips. Engage your core muscles and slowly rise up to a standing position, stacking one vertebra at a time.
  10. Return to Tadasana (Mountain Pose) and observe the effects of the pose on your body and mind.

To live stress free, Forward Fold (Uttanasana) is a calming pose that helps to relieve stress, improve digestion, and stretch the posterior chain of the body. It is important to listen to your body and modify the pose as needed, especially if you have any back or hamstring issues. Always work within your own range of motion and avoid any pain or discomfort.

Legs-Up-The-Wall Pose (Viparita Karani)

To live stress free, Legs-Up-The-Wall Pose, also known as Viparita Karani, is a restorative yoga pose that involves lying on your back with your legs extended up against a wall. It is a gentle inversion that offers numerous benefits for relaxation, circulation, and stress relief.

To practice Legs-Up-The-Wall Pose (Viparita Karani):

  1. Find a clear wall space in a quiet area. You may want to use a folded blanket or bolster to support your lower back and hips.
  2. Sit sideways against the wall with one hip touching the wall and your knees bent.
  3. As you gently lower your torso to the floor, swing your legs up against the wall. Your sitting bones should be as close to the wall as possible.
  4. Extend your legs vertically, allowing your heels to rest gently against the wall. Adjust your position so that you feel comfortable and supported.
  5. If needed, place the folded blanket or bolster under your hips for added support.
  6. Relax your arms by your sides, palms facing up, or rest them on your abdomen or alongside your body, whatever feels most comfortable.
  7. Close your eyes and take slow, deep breaths, allowing your body to surrender into the pose and your muscles to release tension.
  8. Stay in this position for 5 to 15 minutes or longer if desired, focusing on deep breathing and allowing your body and mind to relax.
  9. When you’re ready to come out of the pose, gently bend your knees towards your chest and roll onto your side.
  10. Use your hands to push yourself up into a seated position.

To live stress free, Legs-Up-The-Wall Pose (Viparita Karani) is a soothing pose that helps to calm the nervous system, reduce anxiety, and relieve fatigue. It also encourages healthy circulation, as the legs are elevated above the heart, which can be particularly beneficial for those who spend long hours sitting or standing. This pose is generally safe for most people, but it’s always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional or a qualified yoga instructor if you have any specific concerns or conditions.

Standing Forward Bend (Uttanasana)

To live stress free, Standing Forward Bend, also known as Uttanasana, is a standing yoga pose that involves folding forward from the hips while standing. It is a forward bending pose that stretches the hamstrings, calves, and back, and also helps to calm the mind and relieve stress.

To practice Standing Forward Bend (Uttanasana):

  1. Start by standing in Tadasana (Mountain Pose), with your feet hip-width apart and your arms alongside your body.
  2. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, engage your core muscles and begin to hinge forward at the hips, keeping your back straight.
  3. Bend your knees slightly if you need to, especially if you have tight hamstrings. The focus should be on lengthening the spine.
  4. As you fold forward, allow your head, neck, and arms to hang loosely towards the ground. Let go of any tension in your upper body.
  5. If it feels comfortable, you can bring your hands to the ground in front of you or hold onto your shins or ankles. Alternatively, you can cross your arms and hold onto opposite elbows.
  6. Relax your neck and shoulders, and let the weight of your head and upper body gently stretch the back of your legs.
  7. If your hamstrings allow, you can work towards straightening your legs while maintaining the length in your spine. However, it’s more important to prioritize the integrity of the posture rather than forcing yourself into a deep forward bend.
  8. Breathe deeply and relax into the pose, allowing gravity to assist in the stretch. If you feel comfortable, you can gently sway from side to side to release any additional tension.
  9. Stay in Uttanasana for several breaths, allowing the body to surrender and release tension.
  10. To come out of the pose, bend your knees slightly and engage your core muscles. Slowly rise up, stacking one vertebra at a time, until you are back in a standing position.

To live stress free, Standing Forward Bend (Uttanasana) is a rejuvenating pose that helps to release tension in the back, stretch the hamstrings, and promote a sense of grounding. It can be practiced on its own or as part of a larger yoga sequence. As with any yoga pose, it’s important to listen to your body, modify the posture as needed, and avoid any pain or discomfort.

Bridge Pose (Setu Bandhasana)


To live stress free, Bridge Pose, also known as Setu Bandhasana, is a backbend yoga pose that strengthens the back, opens the chest, and stretches the hips and thighs. It is an accessible pose that can be practiced by beginners and offers various benefits for the body and mind.

To practice Bridge Pose (Setu Bandhasana):

  1. Start by lying on your back on a yoga mat, bending your knees and placing your feet flat on the floor hip-width apart. Your arms should be alongside your body, with the palms facing down.
  2. Press your feet firmly into the mat, engaging your leg muscles and ensuring your knees are pointing forward.
  3. Inhale deeply and as you exhale, lift your hips off the ground. Start by rolling up through your lower back, then your middle back, and finally your upper back.
  4. Keep pressing into your feet and engage your glutes and core muscles to lift your hips higher. Your thighs should be parallel to each other and your chest should be open.
  5. If it feels comfortable, you can interlace your fingers beneath your lifted body and press your arms into the mat, further lifting your chest and creating a gentle shoulder stretch.
  6. Maintain a steady breath and relax your neck and shoulders.
  7. Hold the pose for several breaths, feeling the stretch in your hips and front body while strengthening your back.
  8. To come out of the pose, gently release your interlaced fingers and slowly roll your spine down to the mat, one vertebra at a time.
  9. Rest for a moment with your knees bent and feet on the mat before moving on to the next pose or ending your practice.

To live stress free, Bridge Pose (Setu Bandhasana) helps to improve spine flexibility, strengthen the glutes and hamstrings, and open the chest and shoulders. It also stimulates the thyroid gland and can help alleviate stress and mild depression. As with any yoga pose, it’s important to listen to your body, modify the posture as needed, and avoid any pain or discomfort. If you have any specific concerns or conditions, it’s always advisable to consult with a healthcare professional or a qualified yoga instructor.

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